Humanities and Social/Behavioral Sciences Course Offerings

Home

Humanities and Social/Behavioral Sciences Division Course Offerings

EDUCATION

EDU 0111—PRAXIS I Preparation. Review of basic skills in reading, writing, and mathematics required on the PRAXIS I examination. (1)

 

CHILD PSYCHOLOGY

EPY 2513—Child Psychology. A study of the various aspects of human growth and development during childhood. Topics include physical, psychosocial & cognitive development from conception into emerging adolescence. (3)

EPY 2533—Human Growth & Development. A study of human growth and development from conception through late adulthood, including death and dying. Topics include physical, psychosocial and cognitive development with implications for health professionals and others who work with people. (3)

 

ENGLISH

ENG 0113 – Beginning English—This course is designed to meet the needs of students whose skills in written communication require some standardization. Emphasis is on basic English grammar through varied writing assignments with a review of mechanics, sentence patterns and correct usage. (3 – Institutional credit only)

ENG 1113—English Composition I. (Prerequisite: A score of 15 or above on the ACT English usage section; or an Accuplacer score of 7 or above; or a grade of C or higher in English 0113) A study of the principles of effective written and spoken communication. Word and style awareness, effective sentence structure, organizational skills, and clear thought encouraged. Library orientation provided. (3)

ENG 1123—English Composition II. (Prerequisite: ENG 1113) A continuation of English Composition I with emphasis upon writing expository essays—particularly causal and consequential analyses, logical persuasion and argumentation, and the documented research paper. Higher level thinking skills encouraged through the writing process. (3)

ENG 2133 – Creative Writing. (Prerequisite: ENG 1113 and Consent of the instructor required.) Students will read and critique creative writing such as poems, short stories, essays and plays; use basic tools of literary research; produce original works in various genres which demonstrate the principles of effective scholarly creative writing. (3)

ENG 2153-Traditional Grammar. Primarily for elementary education majors, this course focuses on English fundamentals. Beginning with parts of speech, it covers basic sentence patterns, pronouns, troublesome verbs, subject-verb agreement, spelling, diction, punctuation, and mechanics—all the aspects of traditional grammar that the elementary teacher may encounter in teaching language skills for children. This course is also useful for anyone who wants to refresh his or her knowledge and usage of traditional grammar. (3)

ENG 2223—American Literature I. (Prerequisites: ENG 1113 and ENG 1123) Representative prose and poetry of the United States from Colonial beginnings to Walt Whitman. (3)

ENG 2233—American Literature II. (Prerequisites: ENG 1113 and ENG 1123) Representative prose and poetry of the United States from Walt Whitman to the present. (3)

ENG 2323—English Literature I. (Prerequisites: ENG 1113 and ENG 1123) A survey of English Literature from Beowulf through the ages of Neo Classicism. (3)

ENG 2333—English Literature II. (Prerequisites: ENG 1113 and ENG 1123) A survey of English Literature from the Age of Revolution and Romance to the present time. (3)

ENG 2423—World Literature I. (Prerequisites: ENG 1113 and ENG 1123) Representative prose, poetry, and drama of Asia and Europe from Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance periods. (3)

ENG 2433—World Literature II. (Prerequisites: ENG 1113 and ENG 1123) Representative prose, poetry, and drama of Europe, North America, and South America from the early 18th century to contemporary times. (3)

ENG 2923—Professional Writing. (Prerequisite: ENG 1113) Designed for the student who is interested in writing as a marketable skill. Special emphasis is given to form and structure. Individualized direction in such forms as feature story, fiction, poems, and script is emphasized. (3)

GEOGRAPHY

GEO 1113—World Geography. A regional survey of the basic geographic features and major new developments of the nations of the world. Three hours lecture. (3)

 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION
LECTURE COURSES

HPR 1213—Personal and Community Health I. A comprehensive health course which includes the application of principles and practices of healthful living to the individual and community; major health problems and the mutual responsibilities of home, school, and health agencies. (3)

HPR 1313—Introduction to Health, Physical Education and Recreation. Introduction to the objectives, literature, and organizations of the profession. Analysis of successful teaching with discussion of the responsibilities of opportunities of professional personnel. Orientation of student to opportunities in the field. (3)

HPR 1613—Physical Education in the Elementary School I. This is a study of the growth and development of children including their interests and tendencies. Educational and physical education philosophy and objectives are stressed, as well as methods of teaching. Emphasis is placed on a conceptual approach based on mechanical laws and related concepts which results in a program of physical education presented in sequential progressive problem-solving situations. Theory and laboratory. (3)

HPR 2213—First Aid. Instruction and practice in methods prescribed by the American Red Cross for C.P.R. and Standard First Aid and Personal Safety. (3)

HPR 2423—Football Theory. Theoretical study of football from an offensive and defensive standpoint, including the fundamentals of blocking, passing, tackling, charging, punting, generalship, rules, and team play. (3)

HPR 2433—Basketball Theory. Theoretical study of basketball from an offensive and defensive standpoint, including the study and teaching of the fundamentals and team organizations. (3)

HPR 2443—Athletic Training & Treatment of Injuries. A practical study of safety and first aid, taping, bandaging, and use of massage, and the uses of heat, light, and water in the treatment and prevention of injuries; conditioning of athletes as to diet, rest, work, and proper methods of procedures in training for sports. (3)

HPR 2453—Baseball Theory. Theoretical study of baseball from a coaching standpoint; study of fundamentals and team play; methods of teaching fundamentals; team organization. (3)

HPR 2493 – Softball Theory. Theoretical study of softball from a coaching standpoint; study of fundamentals and team play; methods of teaching fundamentals; team organization. (3)

 

HISTORY

HIS 1113—Western Civilization I. A general survey of European history from ancient times to the mid-seventeeth century (3)

HIS 1123—Western Civilization II A general survey of European civilization since the seventeeth century (3).

HIS 1163—World Civilization I A general survey of world history from ancient times to the 1500s. (3)

HIS 1173—World Civilization II A general survey of world history from the 1500s to modern times. (3)

HIS 2213—American (U.S.) History I. Survey of American (U.S.) history from pre-history through Reconstruction. (3)

HIS 2223—American (U.S.) History II. Survey of American (U.S.) history from Reconstruction to the present. (3)

 

JOURNALISM

JOU 1111—College Publications. The laboratory course is designed to give practical experience in working with college newspaper and yearbook production. News, features, and editorial writing, make up and layout, editing, advertising and photography will be emphasized according to student need. (1)

JOU 1121—College Publications. A continuation of JOU 1111. (1)

JOU 2111—College Publications. A continuation of JOU 1121. (1)

JOU 2121—College Publications. A continuation of JOU 2111. (1)

 

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGE

MFL 1113—Elementary French I. This course is designed to develop basic language skills; reading, speaking, and writing. Classroom and laboratory drills are employed. Extensive study guides are provided, and daily test and quizzes are given.* (3)

MFL 1123—Elementary French II. (Prerequisite: MFL 1113) Special drill on verb forms and uses, as well as idiomatic vocabulary, by means of oral and written exercises. Extensive study guides are provided, and tests and quizzes are given at every classroom and laboratory session.* (3)

MFL 1213—Elementary Spanish I. This course is designed to develop the basic language skills; listening, reading, speaking, and writing. Text-based and teacher-produced classroom activities are used to introduce and to practice grammar and pronunciation. Regularly assigned Internet-based laboratory activities are used to reinforce classroom learning. Spanish video materials are presented for enrichment and comprehension practice. Daily quizzes and chapter tests are given throughout the semester. (3)

MFL 1223—Elementary Spanish II. (Prerequisite: MFL 1213 with a final grade of C or above.) This course is designed to continue to develop the basic language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing. Text-based and teacher-produced classroom activities are used to introduce and to practice grammar and pronunciation. Regularly assigned Internet-based laboratory activities are used to reinforce classroom learning. Spanish video materials are presented for enrichment and comprehension practice. Daily quizzes and chapter tests are given through the semester. Special emphasis is placed upon irregular verbs, reflexives, and the past tense. (3)

MFL 2113—Intermediate French I. (Prerequisites: MFL 1113 and MFL 1123, or two years of high school French and consent of instructor) A review of French grammar and continued development of basic language skills. Reading materials are used which have literary and cultural value. Extensive study guides are provided, and tests and quizzes are given during every class session. (3)

MFL 2123—Intermediate French II. (Prerequisite: MFL 2113) Literary and cultural appreciation of the language and the country is enhanced by further reading in class and by special reports. Extensive study guides are provided, and tests and quizzes are given during every class session. (3)

MFL 2213—Intermediate Spanish I. (Prerequisites: MFL 1213 and MFL 1223 with a final grade of C or above, or two documented years of high school Spanish on transcript and consent of instructor, OR completion of a Spanish placement test indicating readiness for this level and consent of instructor.) This course is designed to continue to develop the basic language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing, as well as to encourage conversation in Spanish in the classroom. Text-based and teacher-produced classroom activities are used to introduce and to practice grammar and pronunciation. Regularly assigned Internet-based laboratory activities are used to reinforce classroom learning. Spanish video materials are presented for enrichment and comprehension practice. Daily quizzes and chapter tests are given through the semester. Special emphasis is placed upon irregular verbs in the preterit, introduction to the imperfect, and introduction to the subjunctive. (3)

MFL 2223—Intermediate Spanish II. (Prerequisite: MFL1213, MFL 1223, and MFL 2213 with a final grade of C or above.) This course is designed to continue to develop the basic language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing, as well as to encourage conversation in Spanish in the classroom through the use of a telenovela and other realia. Text-based and teacher-produced classroom activities are used to introduce and to practice grammar and pronunciation. Regularly assigned Internet-based laboratory activities are used to reinforce classroom learning. Spanish video materials are presented for enrichment and comprehension practice. Daily quizzes and chapter tests are given through the semester. Special emphasis is placed upon further work with the subjunctive, probability, and the perfect tenses. (3)

 

PHILOSOPHY AND BIBLE

PHI 1113—Old Testament Survey. A survey of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) with regard to its worth as a literary work, along with significant dates, themes, concepts and contributions of its characters to that history and literature. (3)

PHI 1133—New Testament Survey. A study of the New Testament covering the life of Jesus of Nazareth and the establishment of the early church as presented in Gospels, Acts, and other New Testament books. (3)

PHI 2113—Introduction to Philosophy. An introduction to the major themes and history of the discipline of Philosophy with an emphasis on the development of critical thinking skills. (3)

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSC 1113—American National Government. Survey of the organizations, political aspects of and basis for American government. (3)

PSC 1123—American State and Local Government. Relationship between states and federal government, and between states and their subdivisions. (3)

 

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 1513—General Psychology. An introduction to the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. This includes history and theories of psychology, research methods, biological bases of behavior, the principles of learning, personality and abnormal behavior. (3)

PSY 2113—Laboratory in Psychology: Cognition & Behavior. Prerequisite: General Psychology (PSY 1513) and Pre or Co-requisite: Statistics (MAT 2323) Students will experience discussion and application of descriptive (survey, case study, archival, and observational), correlation and experimental research methods. Specifically, the purpose is to train students to understand and use research principles, ethics, issues, and methodology for conduction entry-level independent research projects by studying specific areas of human behavioral, perceptual, and cognitive functioning. The student will be introduced to research ethics and issues.

PSY 2553—Psychology of Personal Adjustment. (Prerequisite recommended: General Psychology PSY 1513.) This course provides for the exploration of personal meanings and values. Its focus is on life experience and is intended to assist individuals in being genuine with themselves, recognizing their innermost feelings and sharing their feelings and insights. Three hours lecture. (3)

 

READING SKILLS ENHANCEMENT

REA 0113—Beginning Reading. A course designed to offer reading instruction to students demonstrating a need for proficiency in reading skills at the college level. (3- Institutional credit only)

REA 1213-Reading Enhancement I.  A course provided to help students develop reading skills necessary for success in college.  Diagnostic testing followed by practice in skills according to the needs of the student.  Emphasis on spelling, pronunciation, vocabulary, and some study skills.  Guidance in developing wide reading interest. (3)

 

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 2113—Introduction to Sociology. Deals with human relationships. A synopsis of the whole field of sociology including the social world, the social and cultural process within this world, and the integration of these processes in relating to individuals, groups, and institutions. (3)

SOC 2133—Social Problems. Study of the nature, scope, and effects of the major social problems of today and the theoretical preventive measures to alleviate them. (3)

SOC 2143—Marriage and Family. A study of the family as a cultural unit, the institution of marriage, the problems of parenthood and of social economic adjustments to society. (3)

 

SPEECH

SPT 1113—Public Speaking. A study of the principles of effective speaking and their application in preparing and delivering introductory, demonstration, informative, and persuasive speeches; major emphasis on organization of material. (3)

SPT 1153—Voice and Diction. A study of the breathing and speaking processes; classroom practice and individual performance for improvement of vocal quality, articulation, pronunciation, and expressiveness. (3)

SPT 1213—Fundamentals of Theatre. A basic course in Theatre Arts available to serve as an introduction to the cultural, historical and social aspects of the theatre. The student’s research will include studies of Dramatic Theory and Production concepts from ancient Greek to Modern and Contemporary Theatre. After successfully completing this elective, students will have a working knowledge of: Aristotelian Theory of play structure and function, Medieval Theatre, Elizabethan Theatre, Neo-Classical Theatre, Modern European and American Theatre, as well as Post Modern, including Anti-Theatre and alternative Theater movements. (3)

SPT 1222—Movement for the Actor. Techniques for stage movement for the actor. (2)

SPT 2223—Introduction to Dramatic Arts (Stagecraft). Stagecraft, lighting, makeup, acting, and production techniques. Students are required to participate in assigned plays. Three hours lecture plus laboratory in actual play production. (3)

SPT 1233—Acting I. Introduction to the theatre and the art of acting. Emphasis on technical aspects of acting and expressive use of body in stage movement. Classroom work in mime and the presentation of scenes from plays. Required performance in workshop or production. (3)

SPT 1273 Theatrical Makeup. Techniques in the application of makeup for the stage. (3)

SPT 1241—Drama Production I. Participation in college drama production. (1)

SPT 1251—Drama Production II. Participation in college drama production. (1)

SPT 1261—Drama Production III. Participation in college drama production. (1)

SPT 1271—Drama Production IV. Participation in college drama production. (1)

SPT 2233—Theatre Appreciation (NonMajors). Appreciation of the theatre as performance art; developing audience standards through demonstrations of the unique characteristics of theatre. A fine arts elective. (3)

 

 

Navigation


Credits